Adolescence can be hard on teenagers, but just as difficult on parents as well. You may not know what to say to capture her attention or how to act when she pushes the boundaries. Some parents have more to deal with than others, too. Troubled teens suffering from anxiety, PTSD, depression, or trauma often react differently during their teen years. Instead of pushing the boundaries, they may cross them entirely.

During this time of their life, engaging your teen in a healthy way is extremely important to future communication, assessing their emotional health, and determining whether they need additional help.

Engaging Troubled Teens

Be Firm, Yet Gentle- Most parents instantly miss the connection they used to have with their daughter before she became a moody, unpredictable teenager. When she was eight, she’d tell you her secrets and her fears without blinking. When she was five, she’d relish any time she got to spend with you. Those days might seem like they’re gone. Now she’s pushing you, asserting herself and her freedom as a person.

The best way to react to this is to set rules that you stick to. When your teen crosses the boundaries, but firm, yet gentle. This is a time when they need boundaries they can depend on. Boundaries make us feel safe. When you have to say no, though, it’s okay to show some sympathy. After all, you know how they feel. You were a teen once too.

Let Her Teach You- Are you having trouble with technology? Need some makeup tips? Teens today know a lot about different topics you may not be privy to. Don’t be afraid to ask your daughter for a little help. Not only does it let her be the one doing the talking, but it gives her a chance to engage with you in a non-threatening manner.

Be Active Together– Your health is your first wealth, but being healthy can be boring if you’re doing it by yourself. While your teen’s brain is developing, outdoor activities are an excellent way to help them deal with anxiety and depression while also giving the two of you an opportunity to connect. It’s also an excellent time for you to help them better understand the benefits of exercise and moderation.

Make Yourself Available- And tell them that you’re available. Sometimes the only nudge they need to engage with you is knowing that you’re open to having them do it.

Ask the Right Questions- When you’re talking to your teen, be careful not to ask closed questions that can be answered with a yes or a no. Instead, ask questions that encourage more of a response. Get them talking, even if it’s just about themselves. The more they feel comfortable talking with you, the more likely they’ll do it again and again.

When to Consider Our Boarding School for Girls

If your teen is suffering from depression, anxiety or past trauma and find it difficult to communicate and engage with others, our boarding school for girls is the answer. We offer help for teens in the form of traditional talk therapy, addiction treatment, equine therapy, and group therapy. Our all-girls boarding schools will work with your daughter to help her understand her past and her feelings, and change the perception of past events so she can develop healthy and happy relationships with others.