When your teen is self harming, the constant monitoring and unpredictability of her behavior can be debilitating to your life. Sure, all teens will go through ups and downs in their adolescence. When do you ask for help? Quick question: Does your self harming teen daughter have any of the following behaviors?

  • Eating patterns that resemble an eating disorder
  • Can’t get out of bed
  • Isolates from friends and family
  • Refuses to open up
  • Threatens self harm on a regular basis

When teenagers reach adolescence, it is true that they are trying to figure out who they are, where they fit in in the world and what their life will be like. Some teens may push away from their parents in an effort to take on situations and life on their own, to prepare themselves for adulthood.

However, there is a big difference between exploring independence and crying out for help. There are certain types of behavior that no teenager should participate in. You, as a parent, must know when to ask for help when you notice these five signs.

Using Drugs or Alcohol

Consuming drugs or alcohol is illegal for teenagers and can lead to serious issues. While some troubled teens might claim that they are just experimenting, there is no doubt a reason she was led to trying alcohol or drugs. She could be suffering from teen anxiety, depression or another issue, but instead of turning to an adult, she first experimented with drugs or alcohol to see if they would help.

What your daughter may not know is that using some illegal substances, even once, can result in addiction or overdose. It also can have effects on her brain development.

Teen Self Harming

Self-harm is a behavioral pattern that involves one cutting, burning, scratching or hurting oneself in some way. While this behavior may not be related to suicidal thoughts, it should always be treated like it is. Sometimes it’s the only warning sign that a teen is going to attempt suicide.

In addition to being one of the first signs that your teen may be dealing with depression or suicidal thoughts, cutting, burning or scratching can also lead to physical issues your daughter may not have considered, such as infections.

Eating Disorders and Teens

Eating disorders are a common mental health issues among troubled teens, but are especially common among girls. Anorexia or Bulimia can be very dangerous, so watch for warning signs, such as:

  • – Sudden weight loss
  • – Preoccupation with appearance and weight
  • – Changes in eating behavior
  • – Visiting the bathroom right after a meal
  • – Fear of certain foods

Medical complications can occur if eating disorders are not treated. This can include damage to the bones, kidneys, liver, heart and brain.

Teen Depression

Everyone gets sad, but if your teenager…

  • Can’t get out of bed
  • Refuses to participate in school
  • Is regularly in a lethargic state
  • Has crying spells for no apparent reason
  • Low self esteem
  • Loss of interest in friends and family relationships
  • Has frequent thoughts of suicide, death, or dying
  • Exaggerated self blame or self criticism

She may have depression. In some cases, a depressed teen may stay to herself most of the time and refuses to do things she used to love doing. A depressed teen may also sleep more often than normal.

These cries for help are more than just acting out. Your daughter needs help. In some cases, a psychiatrist may be able to help her begin to feel and express those positive feelings again. In other situations, a much more drastic intervention is needed.

If your daughter is struggling with mental health issues like teen depression, anxiety, or eating disorders, consider getting the right help from our boarding school for girls. We’ve helped many troubled teens who have struggled with self harm, and we can help yours too.

You don’t have to be a perfect parent to deserve help. Sometimes situations require a greater level of care than is available at home, and that’s why we’re here.

Click here to give us a call today. Reclaim your life, while we help your daughter reclaim hers.